Volume 10 Supplement 3

Annual Conference on Hereditary Cancers 2011

Open Access

Serum concentration of selected macro- and microelements and their correlation with the risk of breast and ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers

  • Magdalena Muszyńska1,
  • Grzegorz Sukiennicki1,
  • Tomasz Huzarski1,
  • Jacek Gronwald1,
  • Cezary Cybulski1,
  • Tadeusz Dębniak1,
  • Aleksandra Tołoczko-Grabarek1,
  • Oleg Ashuryk1,
  • Anna Jakubowska1,
  • Antoni Morawski1 and
  • Jan Lubiński1
Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice201210(Suppl 3):A17

DOI: 10.1186/1897-4287-10-S3-A17

Published: 20 April 2012

The study was conducted to determine the correlations between serum concentration of selected macro- and microelements, namely: magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd) chromium (Cr) and selenium (Se) with increased or decreased predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer.

The subjects selected for the trial were Polish women, positive for at least one of three founder mutations in BRCA1 gene dominating in Poland (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA). Persons with detected tumor were considered as cases and the others were considered as controls. One case and two controls were paired regarding many criteria (e.g. age, family cancer history, cigarettes smoking) to achieve the maximum of similarity between them.

All the elements were quantitatively measured simultaneously in diluted serum samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using mass spectrometer (Elan DRC-e, PerkinElmer) in standard mode (Mg, Cu, Zn) and in DRC mode (As, Ca, Cd, Cr) with methane as a reaction gas, for removing polyatomic interferences in measurement.

Statistically significant differences have been found for arsenic and zinc. In case of arsenic, individuals classified in the second and fourth quartile had a significantly higher risk of breast or ovarian cancer than those in the first quartile. In case of zinc a significantly lower risk of breast or ovarian cancer was observed among individuals classified in the second quartile. The data are shown in Table 1.
Table 1

Arsenic and zinc concentration in each quartiles

As (µg/l)

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

1,14 – 3,64[

20(20,2%)

53(26,8%)

1,000

-

[3,64 – 4,51[

29(29,3%)

45(22,7%)

1,708

0.0098

[4,51 – 5,70[

24(24,2%)

51(25,7%)

1,247

0.00719

[5,70 – 57,66

26(26,3%)

49(24,7%)

1,406

0.04843

Zn (µg/l)

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

218,89 – 692,48[

31(31,3%)

43(21,7%)

1,000

-

[692,48 – 756,01[

18(18,2%)

56(28,3%)

0,446

0.02709

[756,01 – 838,00[

24(24,2%)

50(25,3%)

0,666

0.07447

[838,00 – 1911,15

26(26,3%)

49(24,7%)

0,736

0.13030

Apart from the influence of single elements some interactions from combinations of arsenic, magnesium, cadmium, zinc and calcium with selenium were also analyzed. The combinations with statistically significant differences between quartiles in the disease risk are shown in Table 2.
Table 2

Ratios between analyzed elements and selenium

As/Se

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

0.016 - 0.044[

21(21,2%)

53(26,8%)

1,000

-

[0.044 - 0.058[

21(21,2%)

53(26,8%)

1,000

0.163776

[0.058 - 0.072

31(31,3%)

43(21,7%)

1,819

0.000587

[0.072 - 0.14

26(26,3%)

49(24,7%)

1,339

0.005561

Mg/Se

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

17.5 - 226[

31(31,3%)

43(21,7%)

1,000

-

[226 - 257[

16(16,2%)

58(29,3%)

0,383

0.006663

[257 - 292[

30(30,3%)

44(22,2%)

0,946

0.815701

[292 - 456

22(22,2%)

53(26,8%)

0,576

0.003590

Zn/Se

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

0.6 - 8.6[

29(29,3%)

45(22,7%)

1,000

-

[8.6 - 9.8[

21(21,2%)

53(26,8%)

0,615

0.217975

[9.8 - 11.1[

22(22,2%)

52(26,3%)

0,656

0.042510

[11.1 - 29.1

27(27,3%)

48(24,2%)

0,873

0.082148

Ca/Se

Cases (n=99)

Controls (n=198)

OR

p-value

65.25 - 810[

25(25,3%)

49(24,7%)

1,000

-

[810 - 913[

21(21,2%)

53(26,8%)

0,777

0.976515

[913 - 996[

24(24,2%)

50(25,3%)

0,941

0.112279

[996 - 1638

29(29,3%)

46(23,2%)

1,236

0.017070

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Read-Gene SA and Pomeranian Medical University Szczecin

Copyright

© Muszyńska et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2012

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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